MAKE Alaska Partners

We partner with the state’s economic development entities, educational institutions and key industry associations to provide deep knowledge and critical resources to our clients. Our partners are selected carefully to ensure they align with our mission and values and can provide the change that makes the difference for Alaska manufacturing businesses of all sizes and types.

Sea Grant Marine Advisory Program Service Providers

MAKE extends our expertise through strategic partnerships with a variety of consulting professionals throughout the Alaska. We rely on our MAKE Partnerships to deliver services to our clients at the same level of quality as our own staff. It is through their expertise and support that we are able to expand services throughout the state of Alaska.

Check out what the Sea Grant Marine Advisory Program has been doing with the support of the MAKE Program!

Chris Sannito, Seafood Technology Specialist

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As Alaska Sea Grant’s seafood technology specialist, Chris Sannito puzzles through seafood processing challenges to increase efficiency and cost-effectiveness in the seafood industry.

Sannito says that one recent challenge to the seafood processing industry is the need to become more efficient. Increasing minimum wages means that processors are having trouble supporting their staff members. In Kodiak, where pollock harvests have increased, seafood processors are struggling to generate more output with fewer employees.

Technological advances are increasing the efficiency of producing seafood, although new machinery can be quite expensive. A new groundfish processing machine can cost half a million dollars or more. Fish processors around Alaska are also looking to lean manufacturing—which is a method that eliminates waste in a manufacturing system—as a way to increase efficiency and streamline processing, Sannito says.

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Chris Sannito prepares rockfish filets for smoking, part of a project working with a Kodiak fish processor to find ways to increase market value of their products. Photo by Deborah Mercy

Sannito is tackling a number of new projects around the state that increase the use of fish byproducts. One of his projects is looking at using fish skins, which are usually thrown away, to make pet treats. A critical aspect of this project is to learn how marine oils behave in storage, because the treats need to be shelf-stable products.

Another project is developing alternative markets for pollock roe. The market for pollock roe is large in Japan, but market prices have recently begun trending downward. “We’ve put together a group of pollock roe industry specialists with the hopes of creating and identifying some alternate market forms for the roe,” Sannito said.

Focus

  • Seafood processing
  • Environmental compliance
  • Product development
  • Small business operations

Education

  • M.S. Food Science, 1995. University of Alaska Fairbanks
  • B.S. Science and Mathematics, 1989. Hawaii Loa College
  • Pollock skin pet treats
  • Seafood processing workshops and classes

Current Projects

  • Pollock skin pet treats
  • Seafood processing workshops and classes

 

Quentin Fong, Seafood Marketing Specialist

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Focus

  • Food markets and marketing management
  • Business management and planning
  • Trade and the environment
  • Aquaculture and fisheries economics
  • Twelve years of commercial fishing
  • Ten years of seafood trade and marketing
  • Eight years of commercial and research diving
  • Two years of shellfish farm operation

Expertise

  • Twelve years of commercial fishing
  • Ten years of seafood trade and marketing
  • Eight years of commercial and research diving
  • Two years of shellfish farm operation

Education

  • B.S., M.S. Marine Biology, Florida Institute of Technology
  • M.S. Marine Resource Economics, University of Rhode Island
  • Ph.D. Environmental and Natural Resource Economics, University of Rhode Island

Current projects

Paula Cullenburg, Director, Alaska Sea Grant

Paula-Cullenburg.jpgPaula brings to Alaska Sea Grant 30 years of experience in Alaska working with commercial fisheries, program management, and rural economic development.

Currently she is the chairman of the Board of Directors of the Alaska Marine Safety Education Association and a member of the North Pacific Fishery Management Council’s Rural Outreach Committee. She has been a commercial salmon fisherman in Bristol Bay for over 20 years, and has participated in herring and halibut fisheries around the state. Fifteen years ago, Paula was the MAP extension agent in Bristol Bay, where her first child was born.

She is author of Gillnet Hanging and coauthor of Sea Grant's Biological Field Techniques for Chionoecetes Crabs. Formerly director of UAA's North Pacific Fisheries Observer Training Center, she was happy to return to lead the Marine Advisory Program in 2004.

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